Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day

Well, first, I got my dates muddled and thought the 15th was on a Monday.  What’s really annoying is the fact that I essentially loafed around the house yesterday and could have written this post.  My excuse is that I’m coming off a big concert and am still going through post concert recovery.  I know that sounds a bit weird, especially since I’m only on stage for about an hour.  But there’s something about that process, the warm up, the lining up, the standing up that leeches energy.  And, it’s worth it.  I do want to say that besides all the performance stuff, and I’m one of  130 singers, I bake cookies for each performance. Baking, boxing, carting, and setting up take time and energy.  That’s worth it, too.

This is a screen shot, but if you click on the image, you will land on the website and will be able to listen to the first movement in Carmina Burana.
This is a screen shot, but if you click on the image, you will land on the website and will be able to listen to the first movement in Carmina Burana.

But, it’s also my excuse for not posting.

Our cool wet spring continues.  In fact, a couple days ago we saw snow flurries and a frost advisory was posted.  I’ve checked the hostas and so far most of them look ok.  I have a couple in pots that may have gotten nipped.  I’ll know more about damage in a day or so.

The big bloom news is the tall allium that I planted last fall.  I’ve mentioned before that we saw a lot of allium in Toronto during the Garden Bloggers’ Fling.  I ordered a number of different varieties, but only the tall globe “Purple Sensation” are starting to bloom.  I think the cool temps have kept the flowers from fully unfurling, but it will be worth the wait.  And, there are more allium that will bloom throughout the summer.  I’m definitely planting more this coming fall.

I have fallen in love with allium!
I have fallen in love with allium!
Blue Winky columbine bask in the intermittent sun in the secret garden.
Blue Winky columbine bask in the intermittent sun in the secret garden.

The “Blue Winky” columbine are blooming, too, as are the two bleeding hearts.

I have a house guest!! A mason bee has set up housekeeping in my bee abode in the old cherry tree. Perhaps in the coming years there will be more tenants. This is yet another reason I am looking forward to this year's Garden Bloggers' Fling, this time in Minneapolis.
I have a house guest!! A mason bee has set up housekeeping in my bee abode in the old cherry tree. Perhaps in the coming years there will be more tenants. This is yet another reason I am looking forward to this year’s Garden Bloggers’ Fling, this time in Minneapolis. The arrow points to the plugged up tube.  A female has created chambers divided by mud and laid an egg in each chamber.
The bleeding heart light up the little nook outside the sunroom and dining room windows.
The bleeding heart light up the little nook outside the sunroom and dining room windows.

June 15: Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day

East Friesland Sage in the Secret Garden
East Friesland Sage in the Secret Garden. There is a family of wrens in the bird house.

Ah, June.  It’s a happy month in the garden.  The temps this year have been mild and we’ve had enough rain.  I’m getting ready for my big shindig next Saturday which means I’d better hurry up and get the last of the annuals planted.  I have a flat of purple petunias to put in and a few red impatiens.  And there is a dwarf sweet spire that I need to find a place for.  I’ve ordered two more chairs for the sitting area in the Secret Garden.  And, I’m in the process of getting estimates for a new fence that separates my yard from the park.  And, of course, I am enjoying my new brick pathways.  What a lucky gardener I am…

Many thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens for Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day.

Alchemilla and Blue Ice Amsonia in the Secret Garden
Alchemilla and Blue Ice Amsonia in the Secret Garden
Entrance garden.  That is Walker's Low Nepeta in the foreground.
Entrance garden. That is Walker’s Low Nepeta in the foreground.
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Daddy Long Legs on Wild Berry Hansa Rose
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Looking east in the Secret Garden. The Kousa dogwood is in bloom. The huechera in in bloom under the dogwood.
Heuchera in the Secret Garden
Heuchera in the Secret Garden
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Looking into the Secret Garden. Those are red begonias at the entrance.
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White poppies are almost finished blooming
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Berry White Nemesia in the corner nook.
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Purple Smoke Baptisia in the False Garden
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Rose Campion
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Walker’s Low Nepeta with a friend
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Persian Star Allium. I didn’t plant this but found it in a well established day lily bed.
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Bleeding Heart
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Old white climbing rose in the corner nook
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Looking through the Kousa dogwood in the Secret Garden
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Lisanthus in the corner nook
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The northwest corner of the Secret Garden
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Tradescantia in the corner nook



Wild Spice Hansa Rose in the Lower Garden
Wild Spice Hansa Rose in the Lower Garden

 

Cranesbill geranium with  annual geraniums in the Lower Garden
Cranesbill geranium with annual geraniums in the Lower Garden


Corner nook, old white climber and bleeding heart.
Corner nook, old white climber and bleeding heart.

May 15, 2014: Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day

This is my first bloom day of the season!  A shout out to May Dreams Gardens for starting this wonderful tradition of reporting out what is blooming in our gardens on the 15th of each month.  I love going to her website and following the links to gardens all over the world.

Lots of life is happening in the garden.

Who doesn't get a little melty over bleeding heart.  This one is celebrating life in a sheltered corner with a zillion and a half maple seedlings.
Who doesn’t get a little melty over bleeding heart. This one is celebrating life in a sheltered corner with a zillion and a half maple seedlings.







 

I'm a little worried about the Sweet Autumn clematis. I'm not seeing signs of life yet.  The arbor fell over during a wind storm a couple weeks ago.  And, of course, we had a killer winter.  I'm keeping my fingers crossed.
I’m a little worried about the Sweet Autumn clematis. I’m not seeing signs of life yet. The arbor fell over during a wind storm a couple weeks ago. And, of course, we had a killer winter. I’m keeping my fingers crossed.
The pink heather has been blooming for several weeks.  This bed always looks a bit scraggly until the bark goes in and the later blooming plants fill in.
The pink heather has been blooming for several weeks. This bed always looks a bit scraggly until the bark goes in and the later blooming plants fill in.
Lilacs along the north wall of the Secret Garden.
Lilacs along the north wall of the Secret Garden.
Jack Frost Brunnera blooming all by itself in the Secret Garden.
Jack Frost Brunnera blooming all by itself in the Secret Garden.
Hellebore near the back door.
Hellebore near the back door.
Lovely deep pink hellebore that a friend gave me.
Lovely deep pink hellebore that a friend gave me.
I've actually yanked out one large holly bush, and two more will be going to a good home, perhaps this weekend.  But I'm keeping this guy.
I’ve actually yanked out one large holly bush, and two more will be going to a good home, perhaps this weekend. But I’m keeping this guy.
Another shot of the holly that will be staying.  Next to it is another Sweet Autumn clematis that I'm hoping is just sleeping.
Another shot of the holly that will be staying. Next to it is another Sweet Autumn clematis that I’m hoping is just sleeping.
The Foamy Bells have won the heuchera race.  Actually, Foamy Bells are Heucherella, a cross between heuchera and tiarella.
The Foamy Bells have won the heuchera race. Actually, Foamy Bells are Heucherella, a cross between heuchera and tiarella. And, yes, those little bits of green are more maple saplings.
Walker's Low catmint isn't blooming yet, but it really, really wants to.  I'm so in love with this catmint that I think I'm going to plant more of it in the Secret Garden.
Walker’s Low catmint isn’t blooming yet, but it really, really wants to. I’m so in love with this catmint that I think I’m going to plant more of it in the Secret Garden.
The old cherry tree in the lower garden is starting to let it's petals fall.  Each spring I try and stand underneath it so that a few petals will fall on me.
The old cherry tree in the lower garden is starting to let its petals fall. Each spring I try and stand underneath it so that a few petals will fall on me.
The old magnolia in the front garden is just about finished with its blooms.  Our rain has knocked a lot of the flowers to the ground, but this tree is beautiful in all seasons.
The old magnolia in the front garden is just about finished with its blooms. Our rain has knocked a lot of the flowers to the ground, but this tree is beautiful in all seasons.
Sensational lilac along the north wall of the Secret Garden.  LOVE this lilac, but I need to give it hard prune as soon as it stops blooming.
Sensational lilac along the north wall of the Secret Garden. LOVE this lilac, but I need to give it hard prune as soon as it stops blooming.
Madame Lemoine lilac along the north wall of the Secret Garden.
Madame Lemoine lilac along the north wall of the Secret Garden.
Belle de Nancy lilac in the Secret Garden.
Belle de Nancy lilac in the Secret Garden.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day, May 15, 2010

It’s Bloom Day and I’ve ceremoniously taken pictures of today’s participants.

Pana rhododendrons and Cat

The Pana Rhododendrons are doing very well.  I put acid around them last summer and that has made them very happy.  My soil is quite alkaline.

Spirea Japonica (Bridal Veil)

The old spirea is still going strong, and the Francis Williams hostas are holding their own despite the fact that they are surrounded by trailing arches of white.

I was surprised to see one of the catmint (Nepeta subsessilis–Cool Cat) had a couple of small blooms.  These usually appear on longer stalks, but I’ll take this little guy because he is the promise of many more blue blooms later.

Catmint

Also in bloom are the Michael McFarland lilacs.  I worried about these last year.  I got them at the end of the 2008 season at bargain basement prices at a garden center, then transplanted several of them last summer.  I was worried they would just get tired of the shock, but it turns out they are joyously blooming.

Michael McFarland Lilac

I wish my other lilacs bloomed this much this soon after finding their home in my garden.  Alas, I have to wait a few more seasons.  In the meantime, I’ll enjoy the Michaels and their sweet fragrance.

Near the lilacs is the big old dogwood.  It’s blooms look like those of a red twig. It may be as old as the house, which means it got its start in the 1920’s.  The old girl makes a perfect backdrop for the Garden Lady statue.  In the distance behind the Lady are the Cheddar Pinks that have been planted and transplanted several times.

Old dogwood in the secret garden
The Lady and the dogwood

One delightful surprise is the amsonia x Blue Ice.  I bought five of them at the end of the season last summer, for a dollar each.  They are charming and I’m sure will put on more of a show in about a week.  But a bloom is a bloom!

Amsonia x Blue Ice

The Bleeding Heart (dicentra) are starting to fade, but one tendril of blooms trailed over the hat of this little statue that was a gift when I retired from public school teaching.  I bought the plant at Meijer Gardens two years ago.

Bleeding Heart (Dicentra)

Behind this little girl is a “wall” of Virginia Creeper.  I have begun the almost daily battle to keep it at bay.  At one time it completely covered the old fence that used to separate my yard from the park.  Now it only grows on the chain link fence that separates my yard from my neighbor’s.  I chop it.  I dig it up.   The only thing I can’t do is ignore it.

The first of the Heuchera are blooming.  This one is actually not a true Heuchera, but a cross between Heuchera and Tiarella–Foamy Bells.  I like the contrast on the leaves, and it sits well with the Heurcheras that I planted between the boxwoods and the brink entrance way.

Heurcherella, Foamy Bells

And in the secret garden, the columbine (Winky Blue) are still blooming.  They were another end of the season buy.  I love those!

Winky Blue Columbine

The Hansa roses are just getting starting and sending up their first fragrant bloom. Below are Wildberry Breeze and Wild Spice.

I want to thank May Dreams Garden for creating Bloom Day.  A friend told me about it just last week, I think, and went home and began a Google search.  It didn’t take long to bring up May and Blotanical.  I’ve been happily looking at garden blogs ever since.

If you’ve gotten this far, then scroll down just a bit more to see the Hansa roses.  I love these guys!!  They are impervious to pests, with, perhaps, the exception of Japanese Beetles.  But they never get black spot, something that dogs the other roses in the medalion.  And they smell so good!

Hansa Wildberry Breeze
Wild Spice

Bleeding Heart

Three or four years ago I planted two bleeding hearts in a little corner.  Behind it is an old rambler rose that a neighbor gave me the first summer I moved in.  It is doing well, but the bleeding heart is thriving.  I planted another one behind the garage in a little corner, but it doesn’t get warm sun early in the day, and it doesn’t have sun warmed bricks to urge it on.

Bleeding Heart

I realized last summer that my little Olympus camera, though a little work horse, could not take the kinds of pictures that I wanted to take.  So, gulp, yesterday, in anticipation of my tax refund, I bought a Nikon D3000.  This may be too much of a work horse, but it was on clearance and I needed to strike when that sale price was hot.  By the time the battery was charged, it was dark, so the first pictures I took were of the cat.  This morning, though, I took shots of the bleeding heart.  I’m off to get more fertilizer, and may take more pictures when I get back.

Ah, spring.  🙂