October 15: Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day

It could be the last Bloom Day of the season, but November sometimes offers a few surprises. It is the annuals that are showing off, of course, but the mums, a bargain at $2.00 a pot, provide lots of color. And, Honorine Joubert Anemone is shining brightly in The Secret Garden. There is one surprise. The morning glories that I planted late last May have finally decided to bloom. The last hibiscus flower is looking gruesomely beautiful.

I couldn’t resist getting the two standard poodles in this month’s chronicle, though they weren’t very cooperative. What I didn’t know at the time is that Lucy, the black poodle, was busy digging yet another hole in the lawn. See all those bare patches? That would be Lucy’s contribution to the gardens. What is interesting, though, is that I take her regularly to a large dog park where she hasn’t dug a single hole. Anyway, the mums and the Limelight hydrangea in the upper left are blooming. And, of course, there are the annuals that keep summer going a bit longer. I’m always grateful for marigolds.

Mums, marigolds, and, um, moldy peonies are part of the lower garden. I’m looking forward to seeing how the new day lilies look next July.

But, as usual, State Fair Zinnias are still kicking out bouquets. I usually plunk a few hosta leaves in the vases with them.

Here’s a beauty shot of one zinnia.

It’s been a dreary, rainy day, and it perfectly intensified that morning glory blue. The raindrops are just an added bonus. I’m glad my young standard poodle, Lucy, and I got our two mile walk in before the rain came.

I think the Honorine Joubert Anemone is more than six feet tall, propped up, of course by a hidden tomato cage and some garden twine.

They are slightly iridescent so that, even on a rainy day, they glow.

The leaves are reddening and falling. This maple probably found its way from a giant tree in my neighbor’s yard. Last fall I picked up fallen leaves during my walks with Bridget, my 11 year old standard poodle. They are pressed into various books. I think I may have to start collecting some this year, too. The red “sputnik” berries come from the Kousa Dogwood in The Secret Garden.

And, lastly, the gruesomely beautiful dying hibiscus flower. See you next, my beauty.

October Bloom Day

Marigolds
Marigolds

My attempts at creating a stone mosaic in the Secret Garden.
My attempts at creating a stone mosaic in the Secret Garden.

And the middle of the month is upon us.  The garden is winding down but I’m celebrating my new brick pathways.  I’m gradually replacing the rocks that used to line the crushed limestone paths, but were used in some of the stone mosaics in the pathways.

The new brick and field stone entrance to the Secret Garden. Note the single white clematis bloom a the lower left.
The new brick and field stone entrance to the Secret Garden. Note the single white clematis bloom a the lower left.

Where the two paths diverge, a stone and brick flower...
Where the two paths diverge, a stone and brick flower…

The marigolds are the true champions of October.  Though the ones in front of the boxwood hedge did poorly this year, the marigolds I planted near the back door and in front of the Secret Garden are lush.  And, the Honorine Jobert anemones are still blooming.  The nameless pink anemones are done and I’ll be cutting them back soon.

The fruit from the kousa dogwood is ripe and falling onto my new brick paths.  The flies and bees are thick around the smashed fruit.  I’m surprised I don’t see more birds and squirrels in the tree.  The fruit is sweet and edible and I keep thinking I should try making a jam out of it.  I wonder why more people don’t harvest and eat the fruit.

Do scroll down to earlier posts to see more pictures of the pathways.  And please click on the video I made using stills of the garden.

Honorine Joubert anemone
Honorine Joubert anemone

The weird and edible Kousa dogwood fruit.
The weird and edible Kousa dogwood fruit.