Taking Pretty Pictures

See more images on my Flickr page.

I have always been into photography. When my father got his fancy 35 mm Zeiss Icon film camera in the early , early 60’s, he gave me his old Kodak. I had great fun. When I became an adult and could afford my own 33mm, I bought an Olympus. I loved that camera. But, something went wonky on it and stopped using it. And, of course, I had to get the pictures developed. Perhaps 10 years ago I bought a Nikon D3000. I still have that camera and use it.I discovered the joys of instant photography gratification. Once I thought I had learned enough to get a more sophisticated camera, I bought a Nikon D750. I love that camera, though, I think it might be smarter than I am. These days most of my picture taking adventures happen in my gardens. My dog dozes under the Japanese maple and I gather bouquets and snap close ups, pull weeds and deadhead spent flowers. Below are some samples taken with a new super macro lens, a Loawan 60 mm super macro f 2.8 lens.

For 13 years I have been trying to get rid of this weed, tradiscantia fluminenses. I’ve almost succeeded, but not quite. So, using my new fangled super macro lens, and before it is gone completely,I took a picture. The little sucker is rather pretty, but that doesn’t mean I’m going to keep it. I take great pleasure in ripping viney plants out by their roots.

Quite a few years ago I planted five caryopteris bushes. But, they didn’t do well, and eventually I pulled them out. Late last summer I found one at a garden center. So I planted it in a distant corner. And, it’s blooming!
A friend gave me a little clump of this Honorin Jobert anemone. I love it. Long after the day lilies have sent out their last blooms, the anemones begin to bud and flower. I love how the light sparkles off the petals.
Not all hosta flowers are lovely, but that’s not true for Stain Glass. Not only are they lovely, they are fragrant. How interesting that the morning sun caught the anthers and makes the flower look as if it were in a chapel..
It’s hard to ignore a daisy after it rains. This flower was one of dozens and dozens greeting the sun each day.

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