Early May and a Garden Grows

A mason bee gathering pollen from the cherry blossoms.
A mason bee gathering pollen from the cherry blossoms.

The older I get the more sensitive to cold I become.  That means our chilly spring has kept me out of the garden.  And, though the sun has been shining a bit today, it’s still cool, especially when the wind kicks up.  The old cherry tree is beginning to fade.

Unoccupied bee abode waiting for tenants.
Unoccupied bee abode waiting for tenants.still humming with bumble bees and mason bees.
Notice the pollen sacs on the hind legs of this mason bee. It is mason and other solitary bees that pollinate fruit trees. The next time you bite into an apple or pop a blueberry in your mouth, you can thank native bees. Honey bees are still snuggled in their hives. And, native bees are far better pollinators.
Notice the pollen sacs on the hind legs of this mason bee. It is mason and other solitary bees that pollinate fruit trees. The next time you bite into an apple or pop a blueberry in your mouth, you can thank native bees. Honey bees are still snuggled in their hives. But native bees are busy pollinating early bloomers, and, they are far more efficient.

The cherry tree is beginning to lose its blooms and there are small green cherries taking their places.  But there are enough pollen-filled flowers to attract native beens like the mason bee above. I bought a solitary bee house last June when I got back from the Garden Bloggers’ Fling in Toronto, and noticed this afternoon that one of the chambers is full.  To learn more about native bees click here.

We’ve had a lot of rain this spring and our latest deluge knocked most of magnolia blossoms to the ground. I did manage to get a shot before the day turned gloomy again.

A bit tattered, but still lovely.
A bit tattered, but still lovely.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But when the sun was still shining, it caught June Fever with some lovely backlighting.

June Fever, one of my favorite hostas.
June Fever, one of my favorite hostas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I wish I had planted more of these. In fact, I can't imagine why I didn't.
I wish I had planted more of these. In fact, I can’t imagine why I didn’t.

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